North London Tree Surgeons
Mon-Sat: 08:00 - 17:00
07 Aug 2016

Relocating mature trees

<h3>Replanting / Relocating mature trees</h3>

 

In our every day tree surgery we have to move trees as a requirement. It is a tricky process where success leads to a happy tree and if you don’t get it right… a dead tree. So, we decided to share some insights.  Japanese Acer tree planing

You should get ready for relocation procedure beforehand. Dig a groove with depth of 40-50 cm. around the tree intended for replanting a year or two beforehand. All the roots except small ones should be cut off by the inner wall. The groove should be filled with wet soil and then compacted. By the time the tree is ready to be taken out, there will be fibrils formed at the cutoff points of roots. While taking plants up You should be extremely careful not to damage the root fibrils as it is very important for the trees survival. The rootball should be encased firmly with hessian canvas and for added support it should be wrapped with wire cloth for the whole construction not to disperse while it’ll be transported. You can make additional casing with boards.

Removing the tree with a digger

Move and  place the tree carefully in a pit dug  up in advance at the chosen location that you prefilled with compost and feed. You should proceed to carefully remove all the packing materials: boards, wire cloth and hessian canvas. Center the tree and feel up the remaining space with the previously removed soil aiming to have the root collar of the tree placed at ground level. Trees usually suffer very painfully from both: too much deepening or being overexposed on soil level.

After planting the plant you should make a groove in the soil around it and fill it with water. After the water is soaked up – water it again. After watering the soil, cover it with woodchip so that the water does not to evaporate too quickly.

Replanted trees have a large canopy sail but the roots are still loosely bound to the ground. A strong wind may uproot them and to avoid this, immediately after planting You should strengthen the plants with stakes or anchor wires. It would be much safer and durable to set 3 anchor wires. Divide the circle space around the tree into 3 equal parts (about 120° each). Drive firm wooden stakes or metal studs into these points. At the place on the tree, where, in your opinion should the center of gravity of the trunk be, attach three anchor wires. Tighten them and strengthen the lower ends at the stakes or studs. Do not forget to enclose some cloth under the wires on the trunk otherwise the bark, cambium can get damaged as well as the entire tree can get damaged from choking by simply growing and gaining girth.Relocated tree

Trimming just replanted trees is not necessary. The more leaves will be on them the faster roots will recover. It would be good to get an automatic watering system set up for trees regular irrigation at that stage. They need a lot of water whilst the root system gains strength.

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You can contact our tree surgeons should you have any further or other queries.

10 Apr 2014

Tree surgery in London

London Gardens

If you live in London or any other large city, your garden might not be huge.  Urban garden spaceOften houses and maisonettes in the inner London area come with a minimalist city garden or just a decked area.  This is one of the reasons why many people tend to go for houses in Zone 3 and 4 that offer that little bit more outdoor space for your money.  North London is a popular choice for reasonably priced properties that come with old established gardens.

Below is a short guide on how to have a great garden in London

If you have an established garden

If you live in London, butt have a lawn, trees and hear the birds sing in the mornings, many will consider you very fortunate.This, however, also means that your garden will require maintenance.  With close proximity of other houses it is always important to make sure your trees and their branches do not pose any risk to neighbouring properties.

Urban garden spaceLondon tree surgeons are used to working with London properties and will be able to advice on the maintenance and safety of the trees in your garden.  If a tree in your garden has become damaged and needs removing, do get in touch with one of the tree surgeons covering your area in London.  Often different parts of the city have different regulations applicable to specific areas. It is a part of the tree surgeon’s job to be aware of the local and national rules and regulations. London tree surgeons will be familiar with the local authorities’ requirements and will know if their permission is required to carry out the work.

If you want to create a garden

Do research online or ask a professional for advice on what kind of plants will work best for your space.  London tree surgeons and garden designers that are familiar with your area will be able to recommend species that will grow well in your type of garden soil.  They will also recommend trees appropriate for the space that you have.  If your garden is not large you do not want to end up with oversized trees and if you only have one tree, you want to choose an evergreen one to enjoy it all the year round.

If you have a city garden

This is normally nothing more than a small decked or concreted area.  Trees in urban gardenWith a bit of work and very little investment a city garden can become a brilliant space for entertaining or simply relaxing with a book.  Just add astro turf and one or two trees to turn an uninviting empty space into a green heaven. Any London tree surgeon will be able to advise you on which tree will not grow more than you need and will be easy to maintain.

If you have no garden

There is an excellent project called Trees for Cities that is striving to make London and other large cities greener and cleaner.  It involves volunteers who are keen on planting trees and making friends and having a great time in the process.  So far Trees for Cities staff and volunteers have planted 600,000 trees and are aiming to hit 1,000,000 by 2020.  If this sound like something you might enjoy, do get in touch as volunteers are always welcome.